Take me to church

Yes, it is the title of the BBC song of year, but it is also what I did with the twins on Sunday morning. Nothing new to be honest, we have been to mass before, but for a reason or another we took a few months break. While mummy was still going to mass every Wednesday, taking the twins by myself on Sunday morning was an impossible task.

In those early months in which they used to nap at 11 AM, the family service on Sunday morning was the perfect occasion for some quiet time for mummy, a snooze for the boys and a free house for daddy. Since they dropped their morning nap, taking them to a place where they are required to be silent was a little too challenging by myself. What changed? They can finally walk!

If you have only one baby and he/she wakes up and ask (or pretend) to be picked up from the pushchair, there’s no problem, but if you have two… It starts to get complicated and a bit of a work out.

Now that both boys are confident in their walking abilities, I felt happier about taking them to church by myself and I was right. I had to use the oldest trick in the book to keep them happy all the way through (food!), but I was so pleased with their behaviour today. They didn’t cry or fight or run away. They obviously demanded a lot of my attention, but I didn’t mind. I was happy they didn’t throw themselves on the floor crying, like some other toddler. I’m sure this will change when they grow older, but I enjoyed the moment of parental triumph anyway.

I couldn’t follow the mass at all, so half way through I started to wonder why did I put myself through it. Then the time for the communion arrived and the three of us walked together all the way to the altar. When the boys received their blessing I knew exactly why we were there.

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Skype family

My husband is English, while I’m Italian. Our cultures are similar, but somewhat different. As a consequence, our families are very different and this has become more apparent since having the twins.

When we announced that I was pregnant, for example, we received a happy, although composed, congratulation from one family, while a scream and lots of tears from the other. No need to tell you which one was the reaction from the Mediterranean family, right? Since then, many things about the different approaches to family life became apparent between our two cultures, but what really amused me was the reaction we got the other night when we called to share another big news: B can walk!

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I always knew that a baby’s first step is considered an extremely important milestone, but only now I fully understand why. It was a brilliant moment to see little B’s proud face when he let go of daddy’s hands to come trembling towards me. We were so pleased to be all there to take part in this enormous event. So important that my husband had the brilliant idea to call our families on Skype to let them be part of this special moment.

After sorting the dilemma “which family to call first”, we got my sister on the phone and asked her and my mother to go on Skype. Her immediate reaction was “we are having dinner!”, but as soon as I told her the reason why it was so urgent for them to be on Skype, they raced to the laptop holding their pizzas. They spent the rest of their dinner cheering on B in his numerous attempts to walk (or at least complete 3 steps in a row, if you call that walking).

We also tried to call my husband’s parents, but their reply was simple and clear: “we have just started to eat, we will call you back in 15 minutes”. No argument about the fact that the kids could be in bed in 15 minutes or that B could be too tired to perform, made them change their mind. They did called us back 15 minutes later.

If you used a stereotype, you may have thought that the Italian family would have never interrupted a meal for a video call and… you would have been right! They actually carried on eating whilst on Skype!