I choose, you choose, we choose

Learning to make your own choice is an important part of growing up. For twins though there is an extra layer of complication: peer pressure. As a parent I find it hard to guide them in the right direction. 

If peer pressure can make you do stupid stuff when you are a teenager, think what it could do when you are 2 years old. It can literally make you stand on a table… like it happened this morning when T suggested to B to climb a table to reach a light switch. If T suggests something, B will go along with it and this may have some comical, but also some dangerous consequences. 

The twins can choose simple stuff independently. Every morning, for example, they choose the colour of their cereal bowls. The colours do change often, so it feels like they are actually making a decision (not repeating a pattern). Sometimes though they would want the same colour and this signal the end of the world as we know it. Cries and screams could be heard from miles. For example, B this morning was adimant that he wanted the yellow bowl which T was using to eat his breakfast. He cried and cried. He screamed to the top of his voice “YELLOW MUMMY! YELLOW MINE!”. He kept on pointing at T’s bowl and screaming. Nothing would calm him down.
Not an offer of chocolate milk. 

Not an offer of a cuddle. 

Not even when I pointed out that he already had a yellow bowl. In fact T had a green bowl all along and B simply didn’t know his colours!

The wrong swimming class

After a short break from swimming (caused by being in the wrong country every Saturday morning) we went back to it with a renewed enthusiasm and a “new” class…

Not only people think “New year, new me”, but swimming pool management too. From January a new class appeared Ducklings Discovery. Supposedly from 18 to 36 months. My 28 months old boys should have been fine… wrong! The class exercises required all children to touch the bottom of the pool (75cm deep). B, at the vertiginous height of 85cm, could touch but not breathe at the same time!

We joined in anyway and we had fun. B did all of his exercises balancing on my knee and he loved it. Actually T, who at 94cm could touch easily, was less than impressed with the difficulty of the exercises.The class was obviously aimed at preschoolers, not at little toddlers.

The instructor was a little concerned about the new addition to the class and relieved when they didn’t cry… They are not 5 months old babies at their first experience of water, but she treated them as such. I guess I might do the same if a 7 year old randomly joined my GCSE Chemistry class tomorrow morning. She also looked worried about B when she realised they were twins and she even enquired about his health and why he is so small. My husband wanted to reply “we just don’t feed him as much! ” but his serious side had the better of him… fortunately. 

We are back in our usual  class now and very proud to be part of Ducklings 2. We have a lot more things to learn before moving to a higher class permanently. We have to learn to make some bubbles, kick our legs, remember how to use a pool noodle, but most importantly we need to remember to feed B!

Potty training boot camp

The latest parenting ideas from the US is “Potty training boot camp”. 3 days of intense training on how to remove nappies. Basically you don’t leave the house for 3 days and you put your poor child on the toilet/potty a ridiculous number of times each day. Sounds strange? Impossible? A waste of time? 

T, daddy and I are doing it right now! 

Preparation phase

Browsing the Internet you can find long lists of essential items for the training to work, videos on what to do (day by day) and in general a huge quantity of information. My preparation had to be very different as daddy was going to do day one almost entirely by himself!

Not only I prepared plenty of clothes and underpants, laundry detergent and waterproof mats, but I also wrote two lists of possible indoor activities to do. The easy list and the difficult list. In the easy list there were the usual: drawing, duplo, watching TV, etc… In the difficult list there were much harder tasks, such as painting and baking. 

In the build up to day 1 we managed to convince T of how wonderful going to the toilet is, instead of using nappies. We told him that only big boys have underpants so he asked us to see the underpants of the only big boy in the house… That followed a very strange, but hilarious moment for my poor husband.
Day 1 – Nappy off, pants on!

Accidents number: 2

Day 1 was a breeze. Mainly because I was at work! Except for the usual toddler tantrums, he behave really well.

On the morning of day 1 we put some pants on and explained how they need to be kept dry. We reminded him that it is a very important thing to wear underpants and only brave big boys do it. T thought about this and then asked to have a pair of pants for his train as well… Mmh… That was not in any of the videos I watched online!

Day 2 – Adventuring outside the house

Accidents number: 1

We didn’t plan to try our luck outside the house so soon, but after a great first day we felt confident enough to go swimming. Yes, you read that right: we felt confident enough, not him. The thing is that he doesn’t really know what it means to be embarrassed because he peed in his pants in public. He doesn’t have to clean up the mess and he certainly doesn’t realise how expensive his car seat is! The good news is that the car seat was fine, but the cold had the better of his bladder and caused the accident. If you notice a little puddle outside my front door, you now know why. 

Day 3 – Regression

Accidents number: 2

He pooed in his pants… do I have to add anything?